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Syllabus of the Lectures on Midwifery Delivered at Guy’s Hospital [INTERLEAVED]

John Haighton [James Adams]
John Haighton’s midwifery lectures at Guy’s Hospital interleaved in the autumn of 1818 with a trainee physician’s manuscript lectures notes. The… Read more
Published in 1818 by E Cox and Son, St Thomas’s Street, Borough.
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Syllabus of the Lectures on Midwifery Delivered at Guy’s Hospital [INTERLEAVED] by John Haighton [James Adams]

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John Haighton’s midwifery lectures at Guy’s Hospital interleaved in the autumn of 1818 with a trainee physician’s manuscript lectures notes. The book is bound in contemporary sheepskin-covered boards with interleaved blueish sheets of blank paper, apparently done by the book’s first owner, James Adams, who has glued and sewed a new spine covering and reinforced the inner hinges seemingly discarding the final leaf, G4, in the process of pasting over the final printed leaf. (This edition does not match any recorded edition but the nearest comparable edition, also from 1818, ends with this leaf.) Adams’ improvised binding was executed after he had made the notes on 37 leaves of paper which have been inserted already written into his master’s text, adding c2500 words. This binding has endured well though there are 3 and 4cm tears to the outer hinges between front board and spine. Adams’ name is stamped above the first page of the text - B1. He has also recorded the purchase of the book on the preceding title page [de]livered in the Month of Octob[er]’ though this may refer to his first delivery of a baby! The title page has loss close to the gutter at the head of the page where Adam made his improvised paper repair and he has removed part of the foreedge of this and several of the leaves, all of which show heavy use. Adams’ systematic annotations to the interleaves are in the form of his lecture notes, a few interleaves have been removed; where needed Adams has inserted 2 interleaves between each printed leaf. He begins his notes opposite the printed text on the Pelvis with what are clearly Haighton’s words in the lecture hall: ‘It is important to have a knowledge of the Pelvis.’ From there his notes become much more medicalised as Adams expands on Haighton’s sketchy printed text, with additional ink annotation to the text as well as the interleaves. Haighton’s printed text proceeds via anatomy, coitus and inception of pregnancy with these interleaves removed, perhaps censored? Adams takes copious notes on the conditions associated with pregnancy, noting Haighton’s suggestion for treating illnesses of pregnancy wih ‘Potass: Carbon: Zi c Acid: Citric: dy these will form a neutral compound to take the Carbonic Acid gas...’ There are careful notes to sections on examination of pregnant women and then the newly born child ‘If the child doesn’t breathe after labour strike it’ Occasionally Adams refers to other doctors such as ‘Dr Heberides uses the Forceps in these [breech babies] Cases. I think very properly, especially if the Forceps were a little modified.’ Particularly detailed notes on miscarriage and its necessary treatments and, just occasionally, maternal pain relief, so ‘Opium may be given to relax the uterine fibres...’ and aftercare: ‘Always ascertain whether the woman has been injured, or Perineum torn...’ John Haighton was born in 1755 in Lancashire and studied at St Thomas’s in London before lecturing in midwifery and physiology at St Thomas's and Guy's Hospitals for several decades. He published extensively. We have not been able to add any additional details of Adams’ subsequent medical career though he was of course a near contemporary of John Keats at Guy’s.


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Publisher E Cox and Son, St Thomas’s Street, Borough
Date published 1818
Signed Yes
Product code 7884


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