0

Coats of Arms Trick’t: A Herald Painter’s Workbooks [with] William of Orange’s Declaration of Reasons [&] Instructions for the Masters of Wards and Liveries

William of Orange, Constantijn Huygens; James Ley, Earl of Marlborough, [William Constable & Sir John Somers?]
Seventeenth century manuscript collection from the library of the Yorkshire antiquary William Constable which combines a key document of the Glor… Read more
Published in 1650 by .
£7500.00*

Make enquiry

Make enquiry

Coats of Arms Trick’t: A Herald Painter’s Workbooks [with] William of Orange’s Declaration of Reasons [&] Instructions for the Masters of Wards and Liveries by William of Orange, Constantijn Huygens; James Ley, Earl of Marlborough, [William Constable & Sir John Somers?]

To prevent spam, please leave the following text field blank:
Your name*
Your phone number
Your enquiry*
Seventeenth century manuscript collection from the library of the Yorkshire antiquary William Constable which combines a key document of the Glorious Revolution, a herald painter’s workbook and an early copy of the most comprehensive study of a feudal court.

Small folio bound in half calf over marbled boards, extensively rubbed, strengthening to upper hinge, repairs to top and tail of backstrip. Bookplate of Yorkshire antiquary and collector William Constable (1721-1791) of Burton Constable Hall to front pastedown. Possible further provenance to the book collector and Lord Chancellor 1693-1697, Sir John Somers, several of whose books appeared in the collection from which this book emerged recently. The volume contains three separate manuscript works which have been bound together, each on slightly different sized paper and and numbered 29, 29 and 26 to the final leaves of each, possibly in Constable’s hand. Given the binding they have certainly been held together since the eighteenth century and possibly longer.

1. Coats of Arms Trick’t (title on spine label) pp26-122 (c 750 coats of arms) [6] Index. Foolscap watermark, executed mid seventeenth century. Probably a Herald’s workbook with armorials laid out four per page, annotated neatly with codes for colour - tricking - and recording family details, their place of residence and county. The pages have been folded in half to guide the artist’s page layout and are paginated beginning on page 26, so lacking the first 25 pages. The manuscript terminates with a six page index. Most of the families are easily traceable, so in the case of the armorial of ‘Glisson of Rampisham in Dorsettshire and of Bristoll’, this probably refers to Francis Glisson (circa.1597-1677) the English physician and anatomist and President Royal College Physicians. The drawings are detailed and appealing, featuring elephants, mermaids, phoenixes, several example of black faces and an array of contemporary motifs. There are references to arms awarded by specific heralds, notably ‘Ri[chard] St George Clarenceux’ whose tenure ended in 1635 and William Segar (d. 1633) which suggest a mid century date for the manuscript.

2. Assembly Book (Spine Title) or Declaration of Reasons, [2pp]pp 64 - The Declaration of His Highnes William Henry, by the grace of God Prince of Orange, &c. of the reasons inducing him, to appear in Armes in the Kingdome of England. A contemporary copy set out between four red ruled lines and paginated, of William III’s Declaration of Reasons, a key document of the Glorious Revolution. The Declaration was written in September 1688 to legitimise William’s overthrowing of James II in which he argued that James sought absolute power for himself in defiance of England’s constitutional traditions. This document occupies the first 32 pages of the manuscript with the remainder recording the exchanges of letters between Constantijn Huyghens ‘C. Hugins’ in Holland and the provisional London Assembly (hence the title ‘Assembly Book’) followed by a narrative of William’s arrival in Torbay and march to London followed by the December Assembly in Westminster, concluding on December 29th 1688 just as William took control of the provisional government. The text is broadly in line with the subsequently printed House of Commons Journal for the period but does not appear to derive from a printed text.

3. Instructions for the Master of our Wards and Liveries for the better Authorising & Directing of him in the Execution of his Office and Performance of our Service, [pp] 114. An early to mid seventeenth century manuscript copy of Sir James Ley’s Learned Treatise Concerning Wards and Liveries (1642) which exists in a number of seventeenth century manuscript copies that match our manuscript’s title, cf CU MS Ff.4.22, BM Harleian MS 736 No.2 and Inner Temple Petyt MSS. This is the most complete account of the Court which was established in 1540 to deal with monies owed to the king by virtue of his position as a feudal lord in addition to protecting certain rights of marriage and wardship. It was abolished in 1660.


Full details

Added under Manuscript
Date published 1650
Subject 1 Manuscript
Product code 7637


Delivery (UK)

FREE

Delivery (EUROPE)

£10

Delivery (WORLD)

£15
All orders over £200.00 qualify for free delivery!