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ANNOTATED BY ROYALIST PRISONERS AT LAMBETH PALACE The Commentaries of Sr Francis Vere, Being Diverse Pieces of Service

Sir Francis Vere; William Dillingham
A remarkable copy shared and annotated by two prominent royalist prisoners who were interned in Lambeth Palace during the power vacuum of autumn… Read more
Published in 1657 by John Field.
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ANNOTATED BY ROYALIST PRISONERS AT LAMBETH PALACE The Commentaries of Sr Francis Vere, Being Diverse Pieces of Service by Sir Francis Vere; William Dillingham

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A remarkable copy shared and annotated by two prominent royalist prisoners who were interned in Lambeth Palace during the power vacuum of autumn 1659 following the death of Oliver Cromwell and the resignation of his son, Richard, as Protector. The original owner of this book, arch royalist Charles Stanley, 8th Earl Derby, and the man he loaned it to, Henry Norwood (recently returned from a difficult journey to Maryland and Virginia where his cousin was governor, and soon to be an emissary to Charles II in exile) were captured and imprisoned for their part in a royalist uprising in north west England in the summer of 1659. This was their prison reading, annotated with the poetry of the royalist poet Abraham Cowley, carefully passed between them before the moment of their release, and the rewards that came their way for loyalty to the royalist cause that with the Restoration of the Monarchy a few months later in May 1660.

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: 17th century sheepskin binding with blind double fillet to the boards; sympathetically rebacked. The provenance of the book is recorded in some detail on the second flyleaf and the title page where the book’s earliest owner: Charles Stanley, Earl of ‘Derby Lambeth. 20th Oct 1659’ has written his name. At the head of the flyleaf preceding this, Norwood records the loan of the book to him, 6 days later: ‘This booke was lent the 26 Octob, 1659 by Charles Earle of Derby unto his Ld[shi]pps most humble servant At Lambeth house: H. Smith’. Below this in a slightly later hand is recorded an explanation of Norwood’s use of the alias: ‘Collonell Henry Norwood was his right name; during his imprisonment he called himself Smith ut supra [as above].’ Below that are the inscriptions of ‘Edward Bedford his Booke’ and later ‘John Williams his Booke anno 1918’ - Williams’ copious notes on the book are laid in, together with his invoice from James Rimell & Son from whom he acquired this volume in 1918 for £3/3s. Most recently the bookplate of the ‘Fox Pointe Collection. The book collates complete with 3 portrait plates, that of John Ogle with the left eye inked out; a double page image of the Westminster Memorial and a further four maps and two battles scenes: Map of the Sea Coasts; Mappe of the Low Countries; Chart of Bay of Cadiz (lacking top left corner, not touching engraving) Battle of Turnhoult; Battle of Newport; Map of Flanders. A short closed tear at tail of p145-6; some staining through text.

ANNOTATION: Although Norwood has recorded the loan of the volume, it is the book’s first owner, Charles Stanley, who has left a pattern of annotation across the volume. Alongside this book Stanley also had access to a copy of Abraham Cowley’s 1656 Poems and on the second flyleaf he has commonplaced

Cowley’s ‘Drinking/ The Thirsty earth soaks up the raine,/ And drinkes, and gapes...’, noting both the page number and section of the book where the poem is printed: ‘Miscellanies - fol - 32 A Cowley 1659’ and jotting down references and page numbers to other favourites: ‘The Maidenhead’ and ‘Weeping’ from ‘the Mistrisse’. Within the text Stanley has annotated the section relating to Vere’s service in Calais - or ‘Cales’ as he writes it and added two long notes and further minor annotation relating to Vere’s account of the Battle of Newport which he cross-references with Hardouin’s Life of Charles IV of France - presumably another book available to him at Lambeth?

HISTORY: After their enforced stay at Lambeth, both Henry Norwood and Charles Stanley would be rewarded for their loyalty to the royalist cause and to Charles II in particular. After being released in March 1660, Norwood crossed the Channel to be with the King in Brussels, returning with letters, subsequently meeting Pepys in April 1660 and being appointed an Esquire of the Body to the King, who on his Restoration made Norwood Deputy Governor in Dunkirk and Governor of Tangier from 1666. He continued to draw on receipts from his role as Treasurer in Virginia: Norwood’s account of his hair-raising trip to Maryland, which began in 1649 on board The Virginia Merchants - and replete with dolphins, shipwreck, cannibalism, and (friendly) Indians - was eventually published after his death in 1732. The shared used and annotation of this book by two such interesting figures leaves several questions unanswered: notably, whether in his references to Cowley’s Poems and Hardouin’s Life of Charles IV, whether Derby had access to Lambeth’s own books or whether these were texts that he brought with him.


Full details

Added under Book
Publisher John Field
Date published 1657
Subject 1 Book
Product code 8524


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